High Design + Playability = Success

Treehugger.com recently wrote a snarky piece about a new play area in Lexington, MA. The editor of the site dismissed this structure, saying this “play equipment encourages kids to pretend they’re in a Dwell article.”

It sparked my interest. From the images, I thought I saw lots of opportunities for kid directed and variable free play and I began to wonder if we expect – perhaps even unconsciously demand- low caliber aesthetics in outdoor architecture for children?. Do we cynically assume minimal playabllity when good design provides an armature for child-centric activities?

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